NSW Public Health Bulletin archive

NSW Annual Immunisation Coverage Report, 2011

Brynley Hull, Aditi Dey, Sue Campbell-Lloyd, Robert I. Menzies, Peter B. McIntyre

NSW Public Health Bulletin 23(10) 179-186 http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/NB12084 Published: 12 December 2012

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About the author/s

Brynley Hull | National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance, The Children’s Hospital at Westmead

Aditi Dey | National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance, The Children’s Hospital at Westmead

Sue Campbell-Lloyd | Centre for Health Protection, NSW Ministry of Health

Robert I. Menzies | National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance, The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney

Peter B. McIntyre | National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance, The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney

Corresponding author

Brynley Hull | brynley.hull@health.nsw.gov.au

Abstract

This annual report, the third in the series, documents trends in immunisation coverage in NSW for children, adolescents and the elderly, to the end of 2011. Methods: Data from the Australian Childhood Immunisation Register, the NSW School Immunisation Program and the NSW Population Health Survey were used to calculate various measures of population coverage. Results: During 2011, greater than 90% coverage was maintained for children at 12 and 24 months of age. For children at 5 years of age the improvement seen in 2010 was sustained, with coverage at or near 90%. For adolescents, there was improved coverage for all doses of human papillomavirus vaccine, both doses of hepatitis B vaccine, varicella vaccine and the dose of diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis given to school attendees in Years 7 and 10. Pneumococcal vaccination coverage in the elderly has been steadily rising, although it has remained lower than the influenza coverage estimates. Conclusion: This report provides trends in immunisation coverage in NSW across the age spectrum. The inclusion of coverage estimates for the pneumococcal conjugate, varicella and meningococcal C vaccines in the official coverage assessments for ‘fully immunised’ in 2013 is a welcome initiative.