NSW Public Health Bulletin archive

NSW Annual Report Describing Adverse Events Following Immunisation, 2011

Deepika Mahajan, Su Reid, Jane Cook, Kristine Macartney, Robert I. Menzies

NSW Public Health Bulletin 23(10) 187-200 http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/NB12081 Published: 12 December 2012

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About the author/s

Deepika Mahajan | National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance, The Children’s Hospital at Westmead

Su Reid | Health Protection NSW

Jane Cook | Office of Medicine Safety Monitoring, Therapeutic Goods Administration

Kristine Macartney | National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance, The Children’s Hospital at Westmead

Robert I. Menzies | National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance, The Children’s Hospital at Westmead

Abstract

Aim: This report summarises Australian passive surveillance data for adverse events following immunisation in NSW for 2011. Methods: Analysis of de-identified information on all adverse events following immunisation reported to the Therapeutic Goods Administration. Results: 449 adverse events following immunisation were reported for vaccines administered in 2011; this is slightly higher than in 2010 (n=439) and the second highest number since 2003. The most commonly reported reactions were injection site reaction, fever, allergic reaction and malaise. A large number of injection site reactions were reported following administration of the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine in adults aged 65 years and over (97.4/100000 doses) and in children aged less than 7 years following administration of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (29.4/100000 doses) and combined diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (acellular) and inactivated poliovirus (quadrivalent)-containing vaccines (47.1/100000 doses). Only 10% of the reported adverse events were categorised as serious. There were two reports of death however both were attributed to causes other than vaccination. Conclusion: The increased number of reports in 2011 is attributable to the high rates of injection site reactions in children associated with the administration of combined diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (acellular) and inactivated poliovirus (quadrivalent)-containing vaccines and the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, as well as in adults following receipt of the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine.